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How to Find the Best Collaborative Lawyer in Tarrant County (or Anywhere!)

Fortunately, almost all Collaborative lawyers are really good at what we do. In addition, we can work with mental health professionals and financial professionals to provide better representation for all.

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Alimony from Wives: It’s No April Fool Joke

In a recent post, Dan Nunley, of the excellent Oklahoma Family Law Blog, discussed a recent trend that appears to be slowly building. He cited and reprinted an April 1, 2008, Wall Street Journal article about men receiving alimony from their ex-wives. It appears that in about one in three marriages, the wife earns more than the husband does. If those couples divorce, the wife has a possibility of being ordered to help support her husband after the divorce and that apparently does not sit well with some of the wives who are in that situation.

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11 Tips for Preparing for Mediation 2008

As William Wilson recently noted in his Indiana Family Law Blog, spouses often spend more time getting ready for a barbecue than they do getting ready for mediation. From my experience, I have to agree. While they are usually cheaper than going to trial, mediations involve a significant financial investment by each side, but the upside is that about 80-90% of the time, around here, a case settles in mediation. (Keep in mind that in baseball, the greatest hitters connect only 3 times out of 10.) In spite of all that potential for success in mediation, there seems to be little preparation in many cases. What can be done to improve the odds of success or get better settlements? Here are some ideas

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Can You Use Collaborative Law when There’s Been an Affair?

Yes. In litigation, the focus is usually on what happened in the past. Collaborative Divorce focuses on the future. Instead of rehashing past mistakes and bad behavior, the parties in a Collaborative case look forward and try to find or create solutions. Many Collaborative cases have involved situations where adultery occurred and both parties know about it. And those cases are almost always successfully resolved in the Collaborative process.

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Can My 12-Year-Old Decide to Live with Me?

No. One of the most common mis-perceptions about Texas law is that once a child turns 12, he or she can decide where he or she will live, meaning the child can decide who has custody.

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Can Collaborative Law Work for A Custody Case?

There is a common misconception that Collaborative Law will only work, or will work best, when the parties start out in “near agreement” with each other. In other words, it works if the parties are very agreeable people and are close to a settlement. Actually, Collaborative Law works well for major disputes, including alimony, property division and special needs, as well as custody and visitation. Collaborative is a problem-solving process which is not limited or intended for just the easy cases.

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7 Roadblocks to Successful Mediation

Mediation is a very popular and widespread process used to resolve disputes, especially in divorce cases. In many places in Texas and probably most other states, mediation is virtually a requirement before a case can go to trial. The reason is obvious — it works! My observation is that mediated cases settle about 90% of the time, or more.

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5 Types of Divorce Processes

If you are looking to get a divorce, there are many decisions to be made. Among them are the type of process you will use. Yes, there's more than one way to get a divorce in Fort Worth and Tarrant County, Texas.

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5 Tips for Successful Divorce Mediation

If you are in a divorce and are getting ready to try to settle the case, chances are you are about to go to mediation. In Texas, mediation usually involves both parties and their attorneys attending a single session of mediation, for either a half day or a full day. Either way, here are some helpful ideas for preparing for mediation.

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10 Things to Like About Collaborative Divorce

Privacy. In litigation, you have a lot of pleadings filed that are public records and hearings that are held in open courts. Using the Collaborative Law process, you would have a series of short, private meetings away from the Courthouse. The work is conducted quietly and privately. When the agreement is finalized, there is a prove-up at the Courthouse, but it is a minimal, routine appearance. Discussions are held in private and documents are kept private.

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